Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band [LP][Picture Disc]

January 14, 2018 - Comment

Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band’s 2017 stereo mix as a limited, collectible picture disc vinyl LP. Produced by Giles Martin for this year’s universally heralded ‘Sgt. Pepper’ Anniversary Edition releases, the album’s new stereo mix was sourced directly from the original four-track session tapes and guided by the original, Beatles-preferred mono mix produced by

Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band’s 2017 stereo mix as a limited, collectible picture disc vinyl LP. Produced by Giles Martin for this year’s universally heralded ‘Sgt. Pepper’ Anniversary Edition releases, the album’s new stereo mix was sourced directly from the original four-track session tapes and guided by the original, Beatles-preferred mono mix produced by Giles’ father, George Martin. Praised by fans and music critics around the world, The Beatles’ ‘Sgt. Pepper’ Anniversary Edition is 2017’s most celebrated historical music release and an ideal gift for Beatle People here, there, and everywhere.

Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band on the Road Poster Music John Lennon
Paul McCartney
George Harrison
Ringo Starr Book Robin Wagner
Tom O’Horgan Productions 1974 Beacon Theatre

Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band on the Road was a 1974 off-Broadway production directed by Tom O’Horgan.[1] It opened at the Beacon Theatre in New York on November 17, 1974 and ran for a total of 66 performances.[2]

The plot tells of a Candide-like rock music singer, Billy Shears, who marries Strawberry Fields. Billy loses her to death, and his own integrity to Maxwell’s Silver Hammermen, Jack, Sledge and Claw, dressed in chain mail and representing the Hells Angels of the commercial music business. Billy’s bête noire is a temptress named Lucy.

Among the original cast were Ted Neeley as Billy Shears and Alaina Reed as Lucy. David Patrick Kelly played Sgt. Pepper.

The musical would later be loosely adapted into the Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band film.

John Lennon attended several rehearsals and the Opening Night performance with May Pang. It was caught on film in the original promo video for “Whatever Gets You Through the Night”.

Produced by Robert Stigwood, in association with Brian Avnet and Scarab Productions, Inc.
Executive Producer, Peter Brown
Associate Producers: Gatchell and Neufeld, Steven Singer, Steven Metz and Howard Dando

Music and Lyrics by John Lennon, Paul McCartney, George Harrison and Ringo Starr
Directed by Tom O’Horgan
Scenic Design by Robin Wagner
Lighting Design by Jules Fisher
Costume Design by Randy Barceló
Sound Design by Abe Jacob
Music Arranged and conducted by Gordon Lowry Harrell

Production Supervisor: Richard Scanga

Opening Night Cast:
Ted Neeley – Billy Shears
Allan Nicholls – Jack Hammer
Kay Cole – Strawberry fields
B.G. Gibson – Claw Hammer
William Parry – Sledge Hammer
Alaina Reed – Lucy

Hammeroids:

Blake Anderson Arlana Blue Ron Capossoli Stoney Reece Jason Roberts

Understudies:

Billy – David Patrick Kelley Strawberry & Lucy – Stoney Reece Sgt. Pepper, Polythene Pam – Michael Meadows

Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band

*Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band *With A Little Help From My Friends *Lucy In The Sky With Diamonds *Getting Better *Fixing A Hole *She’s Leaving Home *Being for the Benefit of Mr. Kite! *Within You Without You *When I’m Sixty Four *Lovely Rita *Good Morning Good Morning *Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band (Reprise) *A Day In The Life

Released on 1st June, 1967, Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band, the band’s eighth album became the soundtrack to the “summer of love” but its appeal is timeless.

Work had begun on the recording in late 1966 and at one stage it was thought that both Penny Lane and Strawberry Fields Forever would also be included but when these were released as a single in February, that idea was abandoned.

Revolver had only just been completed in time prior to the band flying off on yet another tour. Now that touring was behind them more time could be spent writing and recording. Between November 1966 and April, 1967, they spent over 400 hours in the studio – a far cry from the Please Please Me days.

Of course the music was more complex and now that touring was over, there was no need to consider what could be reproduced in front of a live audience.

In the studio The Beatles encouraged George Martin to achieve “the impossible” and in turn, George and the engineers would find innovative ways of realising this despite still using only four-track equipment.

For the fourth time in the UK, no single was lifted from the album and this also held true in the US. The album was also not banded, encouraging the listener to play it all the way through, pausing only to turn the disc over.

Not only was the music different, exciting and colourful so too was the way it was delivered. The glossy double wallet featured the guys in their Pepper uniforms surrounded by images of people they either admired or were interested in whilst on the back of the sleeve there were the lyrics to all the songs. Inside each side of the wallet were other surprises, a card featuring various cut-outs and in the initial pressings at least, the paper inner sleeve bore a psychedelic design.

In the Britain the album hit number #1 and between June, 1967 and February, 1968 spent a total of 27 weeks at the top during an initial chart run of 148 weeks. All of this, in spite of a BBC ban on “A Day In The Life”.

In the US, the album was released in exactly same way as in Britain… well almost. The high-pitched tone and the garbled speech embedded in the UK run-out groove did not appear on the American release. The album enjoyed a fifteen week stay at the top of the US Top 200 albums during its initial chart run of 88 weeks.

 

Comments

Gregory E. Johnson says:

Terri Gross/The NPR SPLHCB interview

Michael Birman says:

A treasure trove of Beatles memories If you were alive and reasonably conscious in the Spring of 1967 you might have heard a prematurely released, unauthorized version of a brand new Beatles album on the radio before it quickly disappeared for another 6 weeks. It was a tantalizing treat. At the same time, a new single sounding suspiciously like the Beatles hit the FM airwaves but the record was a red herring: New York Mining Disaster by the BeeGees, who were then new to America and something of a Beatles sound-alike. The album was real, however, and when it was finally released for good at the end of May it literally changed the world in ways that are inconceivable today.Sergeant Pepper’s release 50 years ago coincided with a ramp-up in the Vietnam War, an increase in protests on campus and in the streets, and the birth of Hippies and the so-called “Summer of Love.” The album was heard absolutely everywhere all Summer long and it became the soundtrack of that amazing and complex era. It influenced…

David G. Armstrong says:

Power Pop, Punch, & Beyond the Mono vs. Stereo Debate I’m a big rocker, and since the Beatles are my favorite band, I like them to rock as much as possible. The primitive, “gimmicky” and “afterthought” nature of stereo in even the highest rock circles in 1967 led to a weakening of rock songs: often with the anemic-sounding drums relegated to one channel: as if they are in another room. Taking away the power of the drums removes their very essence. Why are they there in the first place? Muffled drums are scarcely drums at all: at least not in rock music. There is a reason why Ringo Starr is said to be very excited about this remix. His remarkable (consistently underrated) efforts are now heard as what they truly were.The remix of “Pepper” follows the trend of Beatles remixes: going back to the glorious 1999 “Yellow Submarine Songtrack” through to the 2006 “Love” and the revised “1”. They all rectify the extreme “right-left” dichotomy stereo, and almost alway put vocals…

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