Cards Against Humanity

January 13, 2018 - Comment

Cards Against Humanity is a party game for horrible people. Unlike most of the party games you’ve played before, Cards Against Humanity is as despicable and awkward as you and your friends. The game is simple. Each round, one player asks a question from a Black Card, and everyone else answers with their funniest White

Cards Against Humanity is a party game for horrible people. Unlike most of the party games you’ve played before, Cards Against Humanity is as despicable and awkward as you and your friends.

The game is simple. Each round, one player asks a question from a Black Card, and everyone else answers with their funniest White Card.

Reviews of Cards Against Humanity:

“Pretty amazing.” – The Onion AV Club

“An incredible game.” – Mike “Gabe” Krahulik, Penny Arcade

“Uncontrollable laughter.” – Kill Screen Magazine

“The game your party deserves.” – Thrillist

“A game.” – The Daily Beast

Product Features

  • Cards Against Humanity is a party game for horrible people.
  • Now version 2.0! Over 150 new cards since the last version.
  • Contains 500 white cards and 100 black cards for maximum replayability.
  • Includes a booklet of sensible game rules and preposterous alternate rules.
  • America’s #1 gerbil coffin.

What is Cards Against Humanity?

Cards Against Humanity is a party game for horrible people. Unlike most of the party games you’ve played before, Cards Against Humanity is as despicable and awkward as you and your friends.

The game is simple. Each round, one player asks a question from a black card, and everyone else answers with their funniest white card.

Make your own deck for free.

Cards Against Humanity is available for free under a Creative Commons license. Making a set will take an hour and cost about $10. Download the PDF for rules and printing instructions.

Cards Against Humanity is available under a Creative Commons BY-NC-SA 2.0 license. That means you can use, remix, and share the game for free, but you can’t sell it without our permission. Please do not steal our name or we will smash you.

Cards Against Humanity is a party game in which players complete fill-in-the-blank statements using words or phrases typically deemed as offensive, risqué or politically incorrect printed on playing cards. It has been compared to the Apples to Apples card game,  originated from a Kickstarter campaign,  and has received media acclaim. Its title references the phrase “crimes against humanity”, reflecting its politically incorrect content.

A black “question” card and a white “answer” card

To start the game, each player draws ten white cards.

According to the rule book provided with the game, the person who most recently “pooped” (a form of primitive randomization) begins as the “Card Czar” (or “Card Tsar”) and plays a black card, face up. The Card Czar then reads the question or fill-in-the-blanks phrase on the black card out loud.

The other players answer the question or fill in the blanks by each passing one white card (or however many required by the black card), face down, to the Card Czar.

The Card Czar shuffles all of the answers and shares each card combination with the group. For full effect, the Card Czar should usually re-read the black card before presenting each answer. The Card Czar then picks the funniest play, and whoever submitted it gets one “Awesome Point”.

After the round, a new player becomes the Card Czar, and everyone draws back up to 10 white cards.

The part of speech of a white card is a noun or gerund, including both single words and phrase constructions. Black cards are either fill-in-the-blank statements or questions. Both white and black cards break these rules on rare occasions.

The rules do not state how to win the game—the object being simply to have fun.

The rules in Cards Against Humanity are flexible and can be altered with the many house rules (which are listed in the rules) that players can incorporate (e.g. winning cards are chosen democratically, ability to trade points for cards, points given by ranks, etc.). The official rules include additional provisions for gambling previously won “Awesome Points” for the right to play additional white cards during a round.

 

Comments

Chrysswen says:

A very funny game to play with family and friends! My oldest son put this game on his Christmas wish list. Knowing nothing about it I purchased it. I was overjoyed that he was asking for something that didn’t require batteries or wasn’t a video game.Now, I realize I’m going to be judged as a bad parent for purchasing this game and for not doing more research before giving it to my teenage son. I accept that. However, this game is so funny.My Husband and I have played it with our son quite a few times and it made us all sit together and just laugh so hard that we snort and end up having some very interesting conversations.Yes, the game is politically incorrect and does have some sexual context but so does everything on TV and on the internet these days.Anything that keeps my teenager talking to me and feeling comfortable speaking with us about odd or uncomfortable things is a win in my parenting handbook.I purchased this game at full price. I was not offered any discount or…

Paul Gomez says:

This game is just f***ing great! Ever wondered what a grown-up version of Apples to Apples would look like? Well, Cards Against Humanity is the perfect response to that desire.If you’ve never played Apples to Apples or Cards Against Humanity, let me fill you in on how CAH works. There are Black Cards and there are White Cards. At the start of each round, one chosen player (The Judge) will select a Black Card from the stack. On these cards will be a phrase or question that needs to be answered/completed. This is where white cards come in. Players have 10 White Cards, which they use to complete the Black Card’s question(s)/blank(s). After each player (besides The Judge) has chosen the best White Card in their hand to go with the Black Card, all players turn their White Cards in to The Judge. From here, The Judge reviews the White Cards and decides his/her favorite pairing of the White and Black Cards. The player who played the Judge’s chosen White Card gets a point (if that matters to your group) and the…

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